Bozeman wins NSF grant

Barry Bozeman received a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation for research on the topic “Collaboration Cosmopolitanism and Scientific and Technical Human Capital: Implications for Women and Underrepresented Minorities.” Monica Gaughan, ASU School of Human Evolution and Social Change and a CORD faculty affiliate is the co-PI.

The study uses the NSF’s  2006 and 2010 National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG) to examine research and technology collaboration and “collaboration cosmopolitanism.” Collaboration cosmopolitanism pertains to the geographic and social distance across science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) personnel in their work-related collaborations.  The study asks “what career routes lead to cosmopolitan collaboration versus more parochial collaboration?” This question is important because there is a relationship between collaboration cosmopolitanism and productivity and because more cosmopolitan research collaboration may generate systemic STEM capacity.

The research includes race and gender as key dimensions given that such factors influence social exchanges such as collaborations, thus yielding variations in career outcomes. We hypothesize that women and underrepresented minorities will tend to have less cosmopolitan collaboration patterns, due to diminished professionally relevant social capital. Focusing on changes between 2006 and 2010 (using NSCG data from both periods) the study examines impacts of collaboration cosmopolitanism on five distinct measures of career success: number employees supervised, job satisfaction, promotion and salary and skill augmentation.     

Overview:

The proposed research employs the The 2006 NSCG is uniquely useful for this purpose inasmuch as it is the only one of the NSCG surveys that included items related to what we refer to as collaboration cosmopolitanism.

Our study asks “what career routes lead to cosmopolitan collaboration versus more parochial collaboration?” This question is important because there is a relationship between collaboration cosmopolitanism and productivity (Lee and Bozeman, 2005) and because more cosmopolitan research collaboration may generate systemic STEM capacity (Melkers and Kiopa, 2010). We include race and gender as key dimensions given that such factors influence social exchanges such as collaborations, thus yielding variations

in career outcomes. We hypothesize that women and underrepresented minorities will tend to have less cosmopolitan collaboration patterns, due to diminished professionally relevant social capital (Leahey, 2006). Focusing on changes between 2006 and 2010 (using NSCG data from both periods) the study examines impacts of collaboration cosmopolitanism on five distinct measures of career success: number employees supervised, job satisfaction, promotion and salary and skill augmentation.